The Tumblr blog of The Rev'd Curtis Farr, including sermons, articles, and other interesting things related to living in and engaging the world in which mystery lies everywhere.
“ Freedom depends, it seems to me, on the degree that one is possessed by the truth. Confronting truth is the state of being under siege and submitting to conquest as gracefully as possible. Such is the price of freedom — ‘the truth will set you free.’… when one accepts Christ humbly and without qualifications, one stands against the personal and social lie — the “world’s truth” — both in oneself and in society. ”
Philip Berrigan, Prison Journals of a Priest Revolutionary. (via locusimperium)

(via dick-of-saint-vick)

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

(via dick-of-saint-vick)

Top ten signs of resurrection in the Episcopal Church

On the Easter People faith and culture podcast, we talk a lot—but hopefully not exclusively—about the Episcopal Church. And we end each episode by naming Green Shoots, the signs of new life we’re seeing in the world around us.

So when I heard about the Acts 8 Moment’s most recent Blogforce Challenge (“What are the top ten signs of resurrection you see in the Episcopal Church?”) , I knew the Easter People archive was the place to begin. (Read our last Acts 8 Blogforce entry here.)

Without further ado, here are my ten signs, all of which appeared as Green Shoots or standalone segments in the first thirteen episodes of Easter People. Happy Easter!

Black Rage Is Christian Rage

Friend and seminary classmate Broderick Greer shares his experience and wisdom with black rage, in the Huffington Post​.

Black self-knowledge — dare I say Christ-knowledge — is a radical practice in the face of a system of government based on white supremacy. To say “I am beautiful” when almost no major magazines depicts bodies of your color is revolutionary. To say “I am free” when you live in a nation hellbent on imprisoning you for no reason other than the color of your skin is revolutionary. To say “I am worthy” when law enforcement sees your body as threatening and dispensable is revolutionary. To say “I am loved” when front-page news says you are violent and frightening is revolutionary. You are beautiful. You are free. You are worthy. You are loved. And I don’t care what anyone says about it. Like my ancestors in rage sang, “before I’d be a slave, I’ll be buried in my grave.” I am free. You are free. And we know this in our bones.

Tim Wise & The Failure of Privilege Discourse

Fighting systemic marginalization and exploitation requires more than good character, and we cannot fetishize personal morals over collective action…

…The truth is that a lot of people, marginalized groups included, simply want more access to existing systems of power.  They don’t want to challenge and push beyond these systems; they just want to participate.  So if we continue to play identity politics and persist with a personal privilege view of power, then we will lose the struggle.  Barack Obama is president, yet White supremacy marches on, and often with his help (record deportationsexpanded a drone war based on profilingfought on behalf of US corporations to repeal a Haitian law that raised the minimum wage).

Click on the title to read more.

Aint Studying You: Phrases to Consider Retiring in 2013: 1. (White) Privilege

…Most of us have come to embrace this vision of the white anti-racist, but, as Robyn Wiegman points out in her incisive, retrospective analysis of Whiteness Studies of the 1990s, these stories strangely posit white people as both the agents of oppression and the agents of black liberation (see Wiegman, The Political Conscious” in Object Lessons). In the white antiracist model, white people can choose to be villains or heroes, making such choices in a state of conscious intention. The project of abolishing whiteness proceeds from the assumption that white people can somehow know that which is “invisible” or “hidden” from them, as a very condition of their socialization. They can obtain superhuman insight. And their choices can make all the difference. The contributions of colonized people to their own liberation are, if not ignored, then certainly moved offstage. Why nonwhite people cannot see or dismantle these hidden systems is not made clear in the theory. White heroism—whether at the level of the buddy film, the domestic melodrama, or the Total Revolution—remains the key ingredient…

Click on the title to read the entire article.

Glimpses

Glimpses http://wp.me/s3UlCF-glimpses

p

Maundy Thursday

The Rev’d Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. told his supporters once that he had “seen the Promised Land.” He told them that though he may not get there with them, he wanted those in the crowd that night to know that they, as a people, would get to the Promised Land. “We mean business now,” King said, “and we are determined to gain our rightful place in God’s world.”

The very next day,…

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