It says "Ask a Priest" up there, as if I have answers.

The Dismembered Body of Christ

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This post first appeared on OnFaith Voices.

Looking from the outside in, Christianity’s degree of denominationalism seems competitive and at times non-productive…and perhaps even a bit absurd. Although most Christians have surely heard Saint Paul’s words that we are one body formed of many parts, we don’t often act like it—even within our denominations.

I would be a bit more optimistic about the…

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Trees and Taxes

By The Rev’d Curtis Farr

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By Jim Bahn (Sherman Tree Uploaded by hike395) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Those who organized the Revised Common Lectionary think they’re so clever. As so many churches make a push for members to begin or increase their giving, they throw in readings like this one from Matthew about paying taxes:

“The Pharisees went…

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nprfreshair:
Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  
Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”
"[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.
I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”
'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone

nprfreshair:

Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  

Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”

"[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.

I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”

'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone

10 Things I Wish Everyone Knew About the Bible - OnFaith

6. The Bible invites debate.

An extremely important lesson for Christians to learn from Judaism is that the Bible invites debate. In fact, it can’t avoid it, given how open it is to multiple interpretations. Winning Bible feuds with others, getting to the right answer, isn’t the end goal. The back-and forth with the Bible, and with God, is where deeper faith is found.

And many more!

Something Quite Ordinary

Something Quite Ordinary: How I came to come out. #comingout

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A few days ago I posted about Journeying Out of the Closet, which was more about expressing faith in and following Jesus Christ. As today is National Coming Out Day, I’ll get more personal with my own story of coming to terms with my sexual identity.

One hopes that by sharing stories we can gain insight into the struggles that our friends, children, parents, siblings, and others go through.…

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An Experiment in Year Round Stewardship

In the fall of 2001, St. Nicholas Episcopal Church was in tough shape. With only $500 in the checking account, anxiety levels were high, and choices needed to be made. Our first response: Asking ourselves “Why do we exist?” In the process, we discovered four things:

  • If we couldn’t answer this question, then it was time for the church to close.
  • We weren’t afraid of dying.
  • We could live with the knowledge that, “We didn’t succeed but were faithful”
  • We couldn’t live with “they were killed by anxiety.”

We could answer the question and we are still here today, still asking the same question.

Is your church in an anxious place? Perhaps asking this same question, ‘why do we exist’ will help clarify next steps for your congregation.

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